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According to the 2017 Content Marketing Benchmark report, 58% of marketers use webinars as a content marketing tactic. And this isn’t putting into consideration other studies that show webinars are effective, especially for business-to-business (B2B) marketers. Webinars are fairly popular  Jon Morrow describes how beneficial webinars have been for his business in these words: “On average, each webinar [...]

The post 3 easily overlooked tips for producing effective webinars appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

According to the 2017 Content Marketing Benchmark report, 58% of marketers use webinars as a content marketing tactic. And this isn’t putting into consideration other studies that show webinars are effective, especially for business-to-business (B2B) marketers.

Webinars are fairly popular 

Jon Morrow describes how beneficial webinars have been for his business in these words:

“On average, each webinar generates about $60,000 in sales. It’s by far the most profitable thing I do. Nothing else even comes close.”

Apart from just making money, webinars have other benefits including:

Most marketers know what webinars are, but few recognize its value. Or those who know its value end up focusing only on how to turn it into a cash cow for their business.

While preparing to produce webinars, be sure you’re doing the following well.

1. Use the right webinar software

There’s the proverb, “a bad workman blames his tools.” That implies that our success doesn’t depend on the kind of tools we use but how we use them. But you’ve probably already figured it’s not always true.

A carpenter for example, will not use a hammer and a needle to nail wooden pieces together successfully. It’s the same with webinar software. Some webinar software excel at some functions better than others, so there’s need to choose carefully.

Your choice of software may depend on a number of factors like:

  • Cost: There are free options like Google Hangouts, Facebook Live, or YouTube Live, all with limited functionality. Then there are low-cost and expensive webinar software too. Make some research and decide which works for your budget.
  • Integrations: Some free tools do not allow functions you’ll normally find on paid webinar software without third-party enhancements, while others offer no enhancements at all. The paid tools often offer third-party software integration, but some are more limited than others. For example, BrightTALK offers integration with six applications, compared to ClickMeeting that offers integration with 22 applications. In the end, choose a platform that allows integrations that work for your needs and those of your audience.
  • Audience size: For paid options, the higher the size of your audience (up to 5,000 or more for most), the more you’ll pay, though that varies based on the platform of your choice and boils down to your budget. Google Hangouts, a free option, only allows a maximum of 25 attendees at a time.
  • Technical skills: It’s easier to set up your webinars on some platforms than on others. Do some review mining, ask for recommendations, or just do a thorough search for a platform that’s a good fit for your technical skills.

When you’ve considered your options based on the factors above, choose wisely.

2. Present content in the most helpful format

A webinar in itself is already a form of content. And it’s an effective one at that. But webinars also have formats, like your typical blog post.

Blog posts can be, but are not limited to:

  • Resources: A big list (50 or more) of helpful tools, tricks, or other posts
  • Interviews: Talk to people with fresh insights you can share with your audience. If it’s audio, you can transcribe it and post on your blog
  • How to’s and tutorials: A post that shows and explains steps to achieving a particular goal.

A typical webinar will have other forms of visual content like images, charts, or even video to increase engagement with your audience. This is important because according to Brain Rules, when we hear a piece of information, we’ll remember 10% of it in three days. If a picture is added to that information, we’ll remember 65% of it in three days.

To take this even further, you can repurpose your webinar into a blog post like Scoop.it does here in this post and include relevant supporting images too. Go check it out.

Repurposing your webinar into a blog post can be helpful 

Visuals can be a part of any of the webinar formats listed below:

  • Question and answer session 

You can have attendees submit questions you’ll answer in advance, or you can have them ask their questions live while the webinar is going on. Either way, this will boost engagement.

  • Having a co-host

If you’re running a question and answer session, you don’t have to answer any questions alone. You can share the duty with another expert on your webinar.

  • Presentation 

Typically the host shares a PowerPoint presentation and gives a formal or rehearsed speech. Presentations are often pre-recorded too. This is easier because it can be used over and over again, but is not good enough for engaging your audience.

  • Interviews 

Interview an expert, customer, or anyone with great ideas you can share with your audience. It works even better if you allow the audience to decide whom you’ll interview in advance through a poll or survey.

  • Panel 

On a panel, several speakers discuss a particular topic and share their different opinions and views on the topic under consideration.

Other types of webinars include:

  • Product demo webinars
  • Case study webinars
  • Training webinars

Depending on the time constraint, availability of speakers, and your webinar platform, choose a suitable format or combination of formats for your webinar.

3. Make your audience yearn for more

All good things must come to an end. So what happens after that? For most marketers, spending an hour or more trying to help others without any return on investment is unreasonable. So it makes sense to include a suitable call-to-action at the end of the webinar.

$60,000 doesn’t just fall into Jon Morrow’s laps after a webinar. The call-to-action at the end of the webinar obviously directs people to a sales page offering a product that solves their problems discussed in the webinar. That should be your goal too if you plan to make any money from your webinars.

Like any other type of content, you’re going to make money from a webinar in one of two ways:

  • Tell the audience what a good solution to their problem is, why it’s important, and then sell them how they can solve that problem.
  • Show the audience how they can solve their problems, then sell them the tool that makes the solution possible.

The rest of what you need to do is on the sales page. Write great copy, of course, and be sure to include a discount or bonus exclusively for the webinar attendees. Or to create a higher sense of urgency, offer the first Y people a discount if they take action in Y amount of time. It will work wonders for your conversions.

Always plan your webinars with an idea of what your audience will likely want to do next.

Take your webinars seriously

Don’t produce a webinar simply because it’s a good way to generate leads. Do it because you have useful content to share with your audience. Because you’ll be surprised the audience can smell a webinar that’s just a sales pitch for a product or service half a mile away, and that will hurt your conversions.

Spend time on truly useful content. Prepare everything specifically with your audience in mind–from the webinar’s content to your product or service offers. You’ll have no regrets.

If you want to get 30 effective techniques to master content marketing along with valuable insights from 10+ influencers like Mark Schaefer, Rebecca Lieb, Lee Odden, Jason Miller or Ian Cleary, download our free eBook now!

roi-or-rip-cta-blog-scoop-it

The post 3 easily overlooked tips for producing effective webinars appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Vikas Agrawal
Posted: January 22, 2018, 4:54 pm

A few months ago, we had the pleasure to host a webinar with our friends at Sociabble (If you missed it, you can catch up here). At that time, we announced our exciting partnership to make curation an essential piece of your employee advocacy / social selling initiatives. Today, I’d like to show you how both [...]

The post How to integrate Scoop.it with Sociabble appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

A few months ago, we had the pleasure to host a webinar with our friends at Sociabble (If you missed it, you can catch up here). At that time, we announced our exciting partnership to make curation an essential piece of your employee advocacy / social selling initiatives.

Today, I’d like to show you how both platforms work together, so you can start enjoying its benefits and make your social selling strategy more effective asap. Here we go.

Create one or several topics pages on Scoop.it

For those who don’t know Scoop.it yet – topic pages are the core of the platform. What’s a topic page, you may ask? Well, it’s a page built to gather content on a special theme, that can be managed by one or several experts in your company. In other words, it’s a page for content monitoring.

Scoop.it helps you:

– Create one or several topic pages on the theme of your choice

– “Scoop” pieces of content from the entire web and benefit from millions of sources offered by its 4 million curators. Of course, these sources can be filtered by keywords.

Start by creating a topic page:

Then, let Scoop.it do the work and suggest the most relevant content. Here, for example, we chose the keyword “Social selling”:

The content you publish on Scoop.it can be edited. You can modify the title, the image, and the short snippet displayed by default. You can also add your own insight (contextualizing is key – it makes it easier to understand for the rest of your team or for your targeted audience), and finally, you can tag your content so you don’t get all lost :).

Each piece of content published on a topic page is stored and available, but curators can choose to either edit or delete them.

Integrate your topic pages within Sociabble

Here you go, you’re curating! You must make sure that all these content gems discovered by curators are available within Sociabble. To do so, you need to be granted admin rights.

On the admin view, click on “Content” > “Social networks” and finally “New”

Then, just select Scoop.it (it’s not a trap I promise)

Enter the URL of your Scoop.it topic page:

Choose the relevant associated channel and voila!

 

The pieces of content on your topic page are available for Sociabble users (on the dedicated channel). It’s now time to amplify with Sociabble!

Be careful though – the Sociabble integration is not available for every version of Scoop.it. If you want more info, just contact us!

The post How to integrate Scoop.it with Sociabble appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Benoit Lamy
Posted: January 18, 2018, 4:50 pm

Virtually every marketer has heard the phrase – “the money is in your list.” So why aren’t your email marketing campaigns gaining momentum? The two biggest reasons are: The leads you attract aren’t very interested in your offer. You aren’t generating enough traffic to your opt-in pages. Refining your content marketing strategy can be the [...]

The post 3 ways content can light a fire under your list building strategy appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Virtually every marketer has heard the phrase – “the money is in your list.” So why aren’t your email marketing campaigns gaining momentum? The two biggest reasons are:

  • The leads you attract aren’t very interested in your offer.
  • You aren’t generating enough traffic to your opt-in pages.

Refining your content marketing strategy can be the best way to address both of these problems. Here are some ways content can push your list building strategy into overdrive.

Build a personal brand

Why do people subscribe to your email list? It’s not necessarily because they think you will give them free stuff but rather VALUE. Depending on your business, that value may come in the form of monetary discounts or insight to help them in some way. Building your personal brand gives people the confidence to know that you are knowledgeable in a specific area and that there’s value in subscribing to your email list.  

Find social platform. Are you a chef? You should be creating amazing Instagram posts of your food. Motivational speaker? Facebook videos should be your daily activity. Digital marketer? I should already be in your funnel.

Collaborate with other personal brands. While you’re making a name for yourself it’s critically important to collaborate with other personal brands to expedite your follower growth. Identify thought leaders in your space and create content together. If you’re a digital marketer, that could mean going on their podcast to share insights from recent campaigns that their audience will find valuable.

Create compelling content…consistently. This is the most important activity in building a personal brand. Your audience started following you because of your content. You need to give them more to keep them coming back. It’s this great content that will allow you to monetize your list in the future.

Create engaging, valuable and shareable content

Creating valuable blog content is a great way to engage followers and build your list. Benefits of creating useful content on your site include:

  • When promoting your page with PPC or media buys, you need to keep investing money into your funnel to maintain a traffic stream. This isn’t the case with blog content. Your website can generate traffic from your content forever at no additional cost.
  • You create a more natural sales funnel. People visit your website to get valuable insights from your blog posts. If you educate them properly, they will eagerly subscribe to your list for more valuable information.
  • When you use paid traffic to drive visitors to your opt-in page, your funnel depends on converting those individual visitors. You can reach far more people by driving organic traffic to your blog posts if they are optimized for social media. Those visitors will share your best posts with their network, which will drive more people to your site. If your posts gain a lot of traction on social media, you can get a lot more traffic and subsequently more email subscribers.

Here are some strategies to gain more email subscribers with your onsite content:

  • Tell personal stories. Too many content marketers share the same tips, which has caused the Internet to be littered with thousands of dull, similar sounding blog posts. Writing more personal stories helps your content seem more engaging.
  • Use original data to illustrate a point. Far too many people use the excuse “there is no original content on the Internet, anymore” to get away with writing the same boring posts. It is simply not true. Collecting your own data is the easiest and most effective way to create engaging posts that stand head and shoulders above your competitors.
  • Partner with other experts in your field. Too many people are worried about providing attribution to their competitors. While you don’t want to help promote your closest competitors, there is no reason that you shouldn’t get content ideas from less direct competitors. Many of your competitors focus on other demographics or regions. Some practice different specialties. Getting quotes and feedback from them can be an excellent way to create more engaging content for your list-building strategy.

Creating valuable blog content is more of an investment than other traffic generation strategies. However, it will pay massive dividends over the long-term. You can generate a steady supply of traffic, which will translate into new subscribers for your list.

Create a more seamless conversion path

Driving a steady supply of traffic isn’t enough to build your list. One case study found that simplifying their funnel allowed them to boost their conversion rate by 173%. In this email list building guide by Campaign Monitor, the email automation company shows the two-step process to provide a seamless conversion path. First, by creating simple subscriber opportunities. This can be done in the following ways:

  • Jf your website sells something, then you can use your checkout process to capture emails. Since you have already collected their name and email, you can include a checkbox to opt them into your email list.
  • Use a subscriber popup on your blog to convert readers into subscribers.
  • Convert Twitter followers into subscribers by using Twitter Lead Generation Cards. These cards are simply a link you can include in your Tweets that expand into a pre-populated window that followers can simply enter their email to subscribe.
  • Use your email signature to include a link to an email opt-in landing page. With hundreds or even thousands of emails being sent by your company each month, there’s ample opportunity to grow your email list.

Second, offer valuable incentives such as:

  • Amazing content can be all you need to incentivize visitors to subscribe, while others use exclusive content only available to subscribers.
  • Discounts and exclusive offers are used to effectively convert visitors to subscribers.
  • Early access to promotions gives loyal followers first dibs on your best deals and products.

Using multiple email subscriber conversion points along with incentives will be the fuel that supercharges your email list building strategy.

 

how-to-design-a-content-strategy-ebook-cta-final

The post 3 ways content can light a fire under your list building strategy appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Megan Totka
Posted: January 16, 2018, 4:24 pm

Since being introduced decades ago, automation has become a staple in the manufacturing industries as well as marketing. With the advancement of recent technologies, that same tool can now be applied to more menial tasks. Through AI, office tasks can be automated now along with manufacturing and retail jobs. Many believe this turn to the [...]

The post Five automated tools to make your business more effective appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Since being introduced decades ago, automation has become a staple in the manufacturing industries as well as marketing.

With the advancement of recent technologies, that same tool can now be applied to more menial tasks. Through AI, office tasks can be automated now along with manufacturing and retail jobs.

Many believe this turn to the future to be the answer to most of the woes of the working world. Some are concerned about the implications of the technology but most look forward to it. The growth pattern of automation is steady and soon enough all businesses will have automation integrated into their models.

For those business owners out there it can be difficult to know just how to add automation functionality to their businesses.

Luckily, great strides have been made and the uses of automation are now seemingly limitless and exceptional. The goal of automation should always be about making work simpler and less manual. Here are some tips to help you choose which automation tools to use for your business.

1. Scoop.it

It is a service dedicated to automating your social media needs and keeping your brand relevant through curation. Social media can be one of the most laborious tasks for any business and in small businesses. It is especially difficult as the owner usually doesn’t have the time to manage it themselves. It can manage social media campaigns and track followers and mentions of your business.

It can be a valuable service for those without the time, patience or money to hire a social media manager. Many users love the service as a can help grow your brand’s awareness.

2. HubSpot

This service utilizes automation to create comprehensive marketing research plans and uses the information to help generate leads. Used by businesses of all kinds and sizes, HubSpot has become a staple tool for many business owners. It generates global inbound marketing to help businesses grow and gain exposure far and wide.

3. Yodle

Yodle is an automation service that uses your local market data to place you, in the most effective ways possible, in your local economy. Since it is a service focused on local markets it can help push your brand into print and other venues around your town. Its goal is to help small businesses become more impactful in their communities and grow locally.

4. Slack

In business one of the most difficult things can be communication. With Slack, much of that difficulty is removed due to the ease of use and instant access that Slack provides. It is fast becoming the premier alternative to email and allows employees to be in constant communication without mix-ups or delays.

Slack uses automation to remind employees of meetings and tasks that otherwise would be forgotten. For many businesses, it has become an invaluable resource that could not be lived without.

5. Zapier

Some of the more tedious tasks in business environments can be migrating attachments and creating spreadsheets. Automatically filling contact sheets and creating layered email protocols is simple with Zapier.

For those that wish to have a more complex filing system without all of the tedium and menial clicking around, Zapier can fulfill those needs via automation by using if-then statements, similar to logic found in Python programming.

It is one of the automated tools that creates a more simplistic work environment and reduces the manual load on talented employees that could be doing something else more productive. Zapier is about utilizing employees and automation to their highest and purest forms.

Conclusion

Ultimately automation is about making business more productive and freeing up employees to do their jobs. it’s about reducing the burden on small business owners without sacrificing the growth of a round-the-clock care.

The advancements made in automation have proven to be solely beneficial and can assist in creating a more meaningful work environment. Automation will take over businesses, at least in some way, soon and it is important to be at the forefront of the technological revolution.

 

And if you need help choosing the best software to skyrocket your content marketing results for 2017, download our free guide with over 44 tools reviewed!

The post Five automated tools to make your business more effective appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Joshua Althauser
Posted: January 10, 2018, 5:30 pm

Content curation has so much going for it. Less content creation time. More authority. SEO benefits. Leads. The list goes on. And while we urge you to do more curation this year, we want you to do it right. Not just for us. For your readers. Your co-workers. Your boss. The internet in general. Because [...]

The post How to avoid 5 big mistakes in content curation appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Content curation has so much going for it. Less content creation time. More authority. SEO benefits. Leads. The list goes on.

And while we urge you to do more curation this year, we want you to do it right.

Not just for us. For your readers. Your co-workers. Your boss. The internet in general.

Because good content curation makes the world better, if only a wee little bit at a time. It helps people find the content that matters to them. That inspires them. That helps them do their jobs better, life better – again, the list goes on and on.

So take a quick look at the mistakes below. Hopefully, you’re not making any of them. But if you are, it’s easy enough to correct course… and curate on.

 

keep calm and curate on

1. You’ve mistaken content curation for content aggregation.

Here are the differences between the two things:

CONTENT CURATION CONTENT AGGREGATION
Content is selected by hand (though it might have been initially rounded up by an automated tool like Scoop.it). Content is automatically selected by a bot or a content filter. So long as it matches the filter or the algorthim, it’s included. No human intervention is required.

 

Content is carefully reviewed by the human curator, and then excerpted (sparingly). The content is not reviewed or excerpted – by a human or a bot. Though it may be summarized by using default content tags like headlines, meta descriptions, and header images.

 

The content selected is grouped together in a way that makes it more meaningful than the separate parts were. As the saying goes, “The whole is greater than the sum of the parts.” The content is just rounded up. There’s no particular order or new meaning from the final list or final group of content pieces.

 

Each individual piece of content is put into context. The curator explains what it means and why it’s important. Then the curator does this for the entire group of curated content to give you a larger view.

 

For example: The curator picks five examples of something, and shows how they mark a new trend in that particular industry or niche.

The content selected is not put in context.

 

Here’s an example for you:

The left side is a blog post that hand-selected three of the best content strategy articles published in a specific time frame. The post summarizes each piece of content carefully, and frames all three posts together as whole to convey the current state of content strategy.

The right side is content aggregation. It’s the results of a Twitter hashtag search for #contentstrategy.

mistaking aggregation for curation is a common content curation mistake

 

As you can see, both outputs (curation and aggregation) result in roughly the same amount of words and pictures.

But after reading the curated piece, you’re smarter. It teaches more. It delivers meaning and context and is more useful to the reader.

2. You’re stuck in a content format rut.

This can be hard to break out of. So many of us struggle to keep up with our reading that it’s easy to get stuck distilling text-based content into a text-based curated piece. Over and over again.

But text is not the only game in town. And the best curators are keenly sensitive to how their audiences consume content. And – as you probably know – we humans usually prefer images and video to text.

Here are a few suggestions for breaking out of the text-based curation rut:

  • Block out 10% of your social media calendar (or items in your blog posts, or sections in your curated newsletters) for infographics and 10% for videos.

Specifically mark these spots to be infographics/visuals or videos ONLY. It will take you a little more time at first to do this curation, but less time than you’d think. Sources like Pinterest are filled with excellent infographics. And YouTube’s search function works well enough… though you might do better to just make a list of 20 companies or influencers in your business, and then go directly to their YouTube accounts.

  • Listen to more podcasts. Turn the tunes down for a bit during your commute and try to listen to just one podcast per day. Maybe it’s while you make dinner, walk your dog, do chores around the house. Just be ready to stop once in a while when the host or guest says something worthwhile. Then go back later and pull the quote. You might even make it into a meme.
  • Hire a design service (like Undullify, Design Pickle or Limitless Designs) and have them make some of your content into images, graphics and even infographics. If you don’t have the time or energy to do this extra content curation work perhaps you’ve got a little budget to have someone else do it for you.

I’ve seen so many successful infographics that are pure content curation. They are a format that absolutely still works, and they are ideally suited to curation.

If you can’t make an infographic (or don’t want to), don’t worry. There are plenty of designers around who won’t charge you an arm and a leg for one.

infographics are often pure content curation

This is the bottom segment of a popular infographic. As you can see from the list of sources here, this is pure curation. Most infographics are.

  • Get better at making videos. I know, I know – you hate being on screen. You don’t have an expensive camera, and you don’t even want clients to see your office, much less the entire audience of YouTube.

Get over it. It’s 2018, video is huge, and it’s time to drop the excuses. Besides, short video gets the highest engagement anyway. And you don’t have to appear on camera.

3. You share the same sources too often

It’s really easy to get lazy with curation and just start sharing content from a couple dozen of your favorite content creators. (I make this mistake all the time myself.) But you have to expand your sources or your audience will get bored.

There are a couple of easy ways to do this.

  • Follow other curators in your niche. Is this cheating? No. It’s staying current with the work in your field.
  • Get yourself some content curation software. Tools like Scoop.it, or our more advanced Hawkeye platform can let you view the top content in your niche through a bunch of different filters and settings.

You don’t have to pick everything you find, of course (that would be aggregation), but using a tool like that can show you everything that’s being published, not just what your favorite sites are publishing. It’ll also show you what people like the most, too.

  • Aim to have out of every ten pieces of content you share be from an entirely new source.
content curation software

Curation software like Scoop.it or Hawkeye can make finding exceptional content much easier.

 

4. You don’t always cite your sources.

This is a massive no-no. You’ll go from someone doing a good thing to someone doing a bad thing almost immediately.

Good curators ALWAYS cite their sources. They give links back – and not links with wimpy “nofollow” tags, either. They are generous with their citations.

Here’s exactly how to do this. Let’s pretend you’ve found a cool statistic you want to use in a round up post. You’ve made a nice graphic out of the stat. To properly give credit to the people who did the expensive and time-consuming research, you:

  • Include a link back to the original report in your text.
  • Add the company’s logo and the name of the report (in small type) to the graphic/image you’ve made.
  • Add the URL of the research to the image as well, so people can easily find the report if the image gets shared far and wide (which could definitely happen).

Here’s what that might look like:

Many children refuse to wear hats. Even when their mothers tell them to.

don't make the content curation mistake of not citing your resources

Now, do you have to do this? No. But will the nice people at Hats For Children appreciate it? You bet. Not only that, but if you cite your sources, your readers will trust you more. And the folks at Hats for Children will be more likely to share your work with their followers.

5. You share low-quality content

This one could cost you your audience. I know that sounds harsh… but as a curator, you have one job to do: Find awesome content so your readers don’t have to.

If the content you find (and offer them) isn’t awesome, there’s no reason for them to follow you. Anybody, at a moment’s notice, can go do a keyword search or browse social media and find a sea of mediocre content. We are awash in it. There are more than 2 million blog posts published every day.

Of course, it’s a lot of work to find awesome content all the time. It’s a lot of work to reshape it into something meaningful.

So surprise: Content curation is work. When it’s done at the highest levels (like Maria Popova’s Brain Pickings) it’s basically content creation itself.

Maria Popova is a content curation master

We may not reach Maria’s level of content curation mastery (she is an MIT Futures of Entertainment Fellow, after all). But we can at least do our work to find and serve up exceptional content, presented in a way that delights and engages our readers.

Fortunately, we’ve got some nice tools to make the work easier.

Back to you

Which content curation mistakes do you see the most? Come on – speak up. Tell us about them in the comments.

content-curation-formats-benefits-cta-blog-scoop-it

The post How to avoid 5 big mistakes in content curation appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Pam Neely
Posted: January 8, 2018, 4:00 pm

When was the last time you read an article online from start to finish – no skimming or skipping paragraphs? For most of us, consuming an entire piece of content – especially of the long-form variety – is challenging. But if you want to get the most out of your content, you need to make [...]

The post 5 ways to get your readers to actually finish your articles appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

When was the last time you read an article online from start to finish – no skimming or skipping paragraphs? For most of us, consuming an entire piece of content – especially of the long-form variety – is challenging. But if you want to get the most out of your content, you need to make sure your readers are moving beyond the first paragraph.

The challenge of dwindling attention spans

There’s a well-recycled statistic out there that says the human attention span has dwindled from 12 seconds at the start of the century to less than 8 seconds today. And while some people argue the legitimacy of this data point, the reality is that attention spans certainly aren’t getting any better. The multisensory nature of the internet, social media, and other digital technologies is rewiring the human brain and making it harder for people to stay focused on singular tasks and objectives – both online and offline.

This is something New York Times reporter Timothy Egan has noticed firsthand, saying, “A New York friend used to send me clever, well-thought-out emails, gems of sprightly prose. Then he switched to texting, which abbreviated his wit and style. Now all verbs and nouns have vanished; he sends emojis, the worst thing to happen to communication in our time.”

Sound familiar? You probably have examples like this in your own life. More specifically, you may have noticed how your dwindling attention span and lack of focus has impacted your ability to read and consume written content.

According to a study by Chartbeat, most website visitors only read half of a web page’s content before bouncing. And by “read,” the study suggests that these visitors are bouncing around on the page, picking out a sentence here and there. To use a popular term, the average internet user is a “skimmer.”

If you’ve noticed this in your own life, then you should assume the same is true of your audience. In fact, you can find out pretty quickly how people are interacting with your content by taking a deep dive into on-page analytics. What you’ll likely discover is that 50 percent or more of your content isn’t being consumed at all. (If it is, it’s being skimmed over with just a few words being picked out here and there.)

Obviously, this is problematic. As a content marketer who uses content to attract, engage, and convert prospective customers, deteriorating attention spans represent a direct threat to your conversion process.

While it would be nice to plant a flag in the ground, promising to take a stand against the demise of concentration by producing such compelling content that readers have no choice but to read your articles from the first word to the last sentence, this simply isn’t realistic. There are too many forces working against you. The average human brain is so overexposed that you’re essentially swimming upstream with Niagara Falls in your face.

You’ll encounter people who will read your articles all the way through – but they fall somewhere on the spectrum between “uncommon” and “unicorn.” Your goal, moving forward, should be to engage the majority of people who aren’t already consuming your content all the way through and convince them to actually finish your content.

5 ways to get readers to finish your articles

Getting readers to finish reading your content – especially when it’s thousands of words in length – is difficult, but it’s not an insurmountable challenge.

1. Write a compelling introduction

Most visitors will give the introductory paragraph a try – and many will read it all the way through. This is your one chance to seize attention and compel people to continue reading the rest of the article. If the introduction is magnetizing and enthralling, people will be more likely to read the next paragraph, and the one after that. If it’s dry and clinical, good luck getting people to do anything other than skim.

2. Use multiple content formats

The key to standing out amidst the noise of the internet is to produce content that contains a variety of formats, as opposed to a singular medium. In other words, you should aim to incorporate text and visuals. This page is a good example. Notice how it uses subheadings, menus, images, CTA buttons, charts, videos, and graphics to keep users stimulated from start to finish.

3. Enhance navigation

How is your on-page navigation? Do you have a bunch of paragraphs strung together like a black and white newspaper article, or does your design feature subheadings, bolded words, hyperlinked text, and vertically oriented graphics that naturally nudge readers down the page?

4. Use the inverted pyramid approach

Are you familiar with the inverted pyramid approach to writing? This is the traditional journalistic format where content gets structured in a way that the most important facts/points go at the top of the article, while the less important, secondary details follow. While you definitely don’t want your content to be boring and journalistic, using this approach will help you encourage people to read further along.

5. String readers along

Sometimes readers need you to hold their hand and walk them through your content. You can do this by stringing them along, so to speak. This may look like asking questions, referencing a topic that will be covered deeper in the article, or setting your readers up for a big reveal at the end of a piece.

Be strategic with your content

Gone are the days where you could sit down, type out a blog post, hit publish, and wait for people to click, read, and comment. If you want to maximize engagement in today’s world of dwindling attention spans, you have to be strategic with the content creation process. This means crafting content in a manner that keeps readers engaged and prompts them to stick around until the end.

Are you willing to make this a priority in 2018?

And if you’d like to know how you can start blogging consistently in 30 minutes a day or less, read our eBook!

how to blog more and blog consistently in 30 min a day or less - ebook by scoop it - download now CTA

The post 5 ways to get your readers to actually finish your articles appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Larry Alton
Posted: January 5, 2018, 4:40 pm

Social selling. If you’ve never heard the word before, you might think it’s some strange new technique devised as an icebreaker for networking events, or perhaps just a new name for Tupperware parties. The reality is much simpler – and much less awkward. Social selling is just using social media to generate relationships, leads, and [...]

The post Content curation for social selling; how to get even better results appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Social selling.

If you’ve never heard the word before, you might think it’s some strange new technique devised as an icebreaker for networking events, or perhaps just a new name for Tupperware parties.

The reality is much simpler – and much less awkward. Social selling is just using social media to generate relationships, leads, and eventually, sales.

Here’s how LinkedIn’s Sales Solutions team defines it:

Social selling is about leveraging your social network to find the right prospects, build trusted relationships, and ultimately, achieve your sales goals.

The term has become more popular in recent years. Surprisingly, it’s actually more widely used than even the term “content curation”.

content curation for social selling

It’s interesting that content curation has gotten so much less attention than social selling, actually. The two tactics couldn’t be more complementary. Content curation for social selling just takes a good thing and makes it better.

Here’s why:

  1. Social selling is, at its core, a trust-building exercise.

So is content curation. And because they share the same goal, they are highly compatible strategies.

  1. The people who do social selling – entrepreneurs and salespeople – are connectors. They aren’t necessarily content creators, and they certainly aren’t full-time content creators.

There’s no way to keep up with the demands of a sales job and write a blog post every day, much less an ebook every month, and spin all that into videos, email newsletters and images. You need outside help.

And so, content curation to the rescue. Other people’s (aka “third party”) content can fill in the gaps in content that salespeople (or their content marketing teams) don’t have time to create in-house.

  1. Salespeople sell solutions now, not products.

And as a result, they need all the authority and expertise they can muster. This is why the best salespeople are experts in their fields.the best salespeople are often thought leaders, too

They know not only the products or services their own company sells – they also know exactly what buyers want and don’t want.

If sales staff only shares in-house content, their authority takes a hit. They look like “that guy” at a party who only talks about himself. So they use third-party content to boost their authority. The more useful and actionable that content is, the better.

 

  1. The way a smart salesperson passes choice pieces of content along fits perfectly into the definition of a good content curator.

Curators have never been people who just grab every piece of content on a topic. They are not automated aggregators.

Good curators – successful ones – carefully select and organize the content they share. They add their own commentary about the content, and put it in context. As Steven Rosenbaum writes in his book, Curate This: “curation is the art of creating something new, coherant and meaningful out of an abundance of related information and ideas.”

Salespeople can be ideal curators because they would never just pass on every piece of content (like an aggregator would). They carefully hand-select content that’s tailored to each company, each prospect, and that suits wherever that buyer is in the sales funnel. They can do this with more sensitivity than an automated content stream, or even a marketing automation system could.

The best salespeople take all this even further. They personalize every piece of content they pass along to their prospects. They write personal notes – maybe highlight sections of the content. Maybe even re-phrase what their prospect said the last time they talked. This is true consultative selling.

One side benefit to all this? It makes a salesperson’s job safer in an increasingly automated world. The very best curation done via social selling is a way for salespeople to demonstrate their value and uniqueness. They have an exceptionally effective – and human – way to build trust and to prompt feedback. Both of which are at the core of building a relationship… and making a sale.

  1. By being a trusted source of information about a particular topic, the salesperson becomes the go-to person in that niche.

According to research from LinkedIn, “92% of B2B buyers engage with sales professionals who are known industry thought leaders.”

And according to sales professionals, trust closes as many deals as proof of ROI.

trust closes sales as much as proof of ROI

This idea of being “top of mind” has been the goal of advertisers for years. Staying top of mind = more sales. A steady stream of properly curated content can do that.

Speaking of which…

  1. Content curation is an ideal way to attract and nurture leads.

This point bridges the work of marketers and salespeople, but every salesperson I know has a list of warmish prospects they check in on from time to time.

Often salespeople use curated content to incubate high-value prospects… even if it takes a year or more to bring them in.

  1. Offering third-party content (not just your own) builds trust. And trust – as we just saw above – sells.

There’s an old study from the CMO Council that illustrates this well. They found that vendor-created content was trusted by only 9% buyers.

That’s barely a sliver of goodwill compared to how much trust professional association research or analyst reports and white papers generated.

third party content (curated content) is trusted more than the content published by your brand

Key takeaway here? If you wanted to make a point (that you could use to close a sale with later), you’d be far better off forwarding association research or an independent analyst’s piece of content than your own company’s content. Your prospect trusts those sources more.

How to bring more content curation into your social selling.

Every salesperson knows to check in with their prospects on a regular basis. And there are plenty of good excuses for doing so:

  • Because it’s been a month since you last spoke
  • Because it’s their birthday
  • Because they just launched a new product
  • Because the salesperson has a new product

Those are all fine, but they’re pretenses. And everybody knows they’re pretenses.

And everybody hates to be sold to.

But the tone of the contacts change if you send along a piece of research that might actually help your prospect do their job.

In fact, more than 90% of buyers say they are more likely to consider a brand’s products or services if their sales reps “share content applicable to my role in the decision-making process”.

content curation for social selling - buyer's expectations of custom content recommendations

Buyers’ expectations have become so high that it isn’t even “going the extra mile” any more to give them highly relevant, useful information. It’s expected. LinkedIn reports that “64% of B2B decision-makers said they wouldn’t engage with a salesperson if the communication was not personalized.”

Here’s an example of what this might look like: Send a prospect a copy of a well-known business book that your prospect has probably heard of, but might not have had time to read. And a personalized note to the package, and perhaps flag a chapter or two that you think they’d be particularly interested in.

Voila! You’ve just done something about 20x more meaningful than leaving yet another message on their voicemail.

Could marketing do most of your company’s content curation work?

We’ve seen that content curation can work. But if you’ve got any more than one salesperson, it might be more efficient to name one person as the company curator, and let everyone else have access to a pre-approved curated content vault.

And being that marketing is already so deep into the content creation and management business, it makes sense they should manage curation, too. Particularly if you have a system set up so sales staff can recommend content for curation easily. Sales has tremendous knowledge about what prospects and customers need and know – never leave them out of the content loop.

Hopefully, your content marketing team has the bandwidth for managing content curation. But if they don’t… sorry, sales, you may need to become your own content curators. The good news is, once you’ve got a central content library, you’re far more likely to increase sales.

Here’s proof:

content curation for social selling

The chart above is from Aberdeen, based on research they did among B2B companies. As you can see, top-performing companies have a vault of pre-approved content to support the sales’ teams social selling work.

This pays off in spades. Aberdeen found that “67% of Best-in-Class organizations (the top 20% of respondents in terms of key business metrics) report that they support their sales enablement efforts with content.”

To really make your social selling hum, marketing also needs to share what it knows about the buyer’s journey with sales. Specifically, salespeople need to know how many touches they need to have with a prospect before a sale can expect to close. As Aberdeen puts it,

For sales reps to be effective social sellers, they need to know how many interactions it takes, on average, to close a deal, so they can plan out how many sales – and more importantly, non-sales – conversations they need to have with prospects before they’ll be ready to sign on the dotted line. Such non-selling interactions present the ideal opportunity to share knowledge that helps their buyer, as opposed to shallow conversations”.

 

A few ideas to get your content curation for social selling program started

  • Start scouring industry associations and publications for research. Any time you find something good, add it to your curated content vault. Then make a list of your existing prospects who would be interested in this information. Finally, create a distilled version of the research – a one-page or even half page summary (the more visual, the better) and send it along.
  • Experiment with the best ways to send the information. Email is the default, but everyone’s inbox is full. Direct mail – or even better, “lumpy mail” is often a better bet. And books are an ideal form of lumpy mail.
  • Also experiment with different content formats. We all get so stuck in text that we forget about video or images, or even audio. You could be particularly helpful if you took a thick industry report and made it into a far more consumable content format – like a video.

Mary Meeker’s annual report is a great example. It’s considered a “must read” in many circles, but it’s also nearly 100 pages long. You might get the attention of a lot of your prospects if you distilled Meeker’s report into a five-minute video tailored expressly for their needs and interests.

  • Make sure you have an easy-to-use curation software package. Once people really start curating, it helps to have smart software to keep everything organized and easily assessable.

Conclusion

Buyers are too busy to accept endless voicemails and emails that do nothing to actually help them. And yet, they are hungrier than ever before for useful information. But they simply don’t have time to read every industry publication, every blog post, every webinar, every research study, or even the “must-read” books.

But if you are willing to do that, and can curate what you learn for them, suddenly you’re no longer “just a salesperson”. You are instantly an industry expert. A subject authority. Someone who truly can help them.

Position yourself like that and see if you don’t get more returned phone calls, emails, and social media messages. And a lot more sales.

content-curation-formats-benefits-cta-blog-scoop-it

The post Content curation for social selling; how to get even better results appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Pam Neely
Posted: January 2, 2018, 5:12 pm

So you finally decided to embrace content marketing for 2018. That's great news! But do you really know what to expect in terms of investment? As we stated in a previous post, content marketing works... success is proven, but some upfront investment is required. Of course, it will depend on what you're trying to achieve with content marketing (get better rankings, get more traffic etc.)

The post Getting started with content marketing: 3 different frameworks for SMBs to set the right expectations appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

So you finally decided to embrace content marketing for 2018. That’s great news!

But do you really know what to expect in terms of investment? As we stated in a previous post, content marketing works… success is proven, but some upfront investment is required. Of course, it will depend on what you’re trying to achieve with content marketing (get better rankings, get more traffic etc.)

So how to have a clear view on this?

Here are 3 different frameworks to help you understand better what’s the minimum investment you can make to prove the value of content, and get you set up with the right expectations.

1. The SEO content strategy

How it works:

  • Build an SEO plan based on researching topics you want and can rank for.
  • Define a content plan.
  • Recruit corresponding resources.
  • Produce that content.
  • Distribute it for SEO results (backlinks, social…).

Expectations, risks and costs:

This plan will require an upfront investment in original content creation.

Success will be more organic traffic to the website, which is usually the best type of traffic (but again assuming you’ve got your topics right at the research phase as traffic doesn’t always equate revenue).

SEO is hard: success will depend on the quality of the upfront research and the quality and expertise of the writers.

Who it’s usually for:

Companies with transactional sales that can benefit from search traffic most (short sales cycles).

When brand awareness in itself is an objective (as opposed to revenue generation).

Your free resource to get started

Your guide to creating unicorn content by discovering and capitalizing on topic trends

2. The B2B lead generation content strategy

How it works:

  • Define buyer personas.
  • Map the buyer’s journey in funnel stages.
  • Document their topics of interest throughout the buyer’s journey by conducting interviews with customers and the sales team.
  • Define a content plan.
  • Recruit corresponding resources.
  • Produce that content.
  • Distribute it for conversion (social, social selling, email, retargeting…)

Expectations, risks and costs:

This plan will require an upfront investment in original content creation.

Success will be more MQL’s (marketing qualified leads) with a direct impact for the sales team.

Distribution has a cost: in highly competitive markets where vendors have embraced content marketing, the risk is to produce metoo content that will require content distribution efforts to generate results and that need to be factored in in the budget (tools, ads…).

Who it’s usually for:

B2B companies with a focus on demand and lead generation.

Companies where there is a strong demand for measurable ROI of marketing investments.

Your free resource to get started

How to design a content strategy that generates leads from day one

3. The SME-driven curated content strategy

How it works:

  • Start creating a culture of content by involving the team in content curation.
  • Learn what resonates with your audience with marginal efforts and investment.
  • Scale when you have content/market fit.

Expectations, risks and costs:

This plan is more progressive as the upfront investment is much smaller than in #1 or #2.

Success would be less ambitious initially (a more dynamic web presence but primarily a way to engage website visitors and email subscribers). But over time it’s about “learning by doing”: not just because you’ll see what topic and content resonates with your audience (without having to produce it) but also by getting everyone internally involved in content marketing – something that can be key if you believe that over time, your SME’s are the ones that will make your content more unique.

Success will depend on SME’s being really involved.

Who it’s usually for:

Companies where nurturing contacts and engaging website visitors is an objective in itself.

Companies with doubts about content marketing results but are looking to get their feet wet at marginal costs.

Your free resource to get started:

Content curation formats, benefits and technologies

 

If you want to get 30 effective techniques to master content marketing along with valuable insights from 10+ influencers like Mark Schaefer, Rebecca Lieb, Lee Odden, Jason Miller or Ian Cleary, download our free eBook now!

roi-or-rip-cta-blog-scoop-it

The post Getting started with content marketing: 3 different frameworks for SMBs to set the right expectations appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Guillaume Decugis
Posted: December 21, 2017, 7:47 pm

A healthy blog is the cornerstone of a successful content marketing campaign. Each article needs to speak to your target audience with a consistent brand voice. The articles you choose to publish must solve a problem for your reader. They should reduce pain and aggravation, positioning your products as the ultimate solution to their immediate [...]

The post Learn to leverage clever headlines involving power brands to generate buzzworthy content appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

A healthy blog is the cornerstone of a successful content marketing campaign. Each article needs to speak to your target audience with a consistent brand voice. The articles you choose to publish must solve a problem for your reader. They should reduce pain and aggravation, positioning your products as the ultimate solution to their immediate need.

Balance “How-To” content with “Current Event Curiosity” articles

One of the biggest mistakes I see aggressive content marketers make is embracing the instinct to publish a ton of how-to guides, product comparisons and troubleshooting articles. Talking about your product and how it can improve the lives of your reader is a good start. But you need more than that.

A well-rounded blog solves the pain points for the reader, while peeking their curiosity about current events. Forgetting to cover current events is kind of like forcing your audience to read the product manual, without providing the context for why reading the manual is important.

Use current events to sell your message

I look for ways to highlight exciting events involving recognizable brands. Adding a couple of current event stories for every 5-10 how-to posts is a great way to spice up the headlines on your blog and reinforce relevancy.

For example, this story involving Domino’s installation of Tesla Powerwalls at their pizza franchise provides a current event story that reinforces the importance of renewable energy for forward-thinking brands. It has all of the important ingredients – two iconic brands and a sympathetic cause that can be used to focus the audience on renewable energy products.

Playing to a reader’s sense of curiosity has always been a mainstay of modern marketing. But, if you can spark their curiosity within the context of your product-line, you’ve got a winner.

Create your own PR good luck

Finding current events that play to your product line can be difficult. So, if you’re struggling to come up with some story angles, take a page out of Elon Musk’s playbook. Within days of hurricane Irma decimating the Puerto Rican power grid, he announced that Tesla would be sending hundreds of battery packs to help distribute power to communities left in the dark.

The brilliance of this is two-fold. First, he gets to flex his bona fides as an ethical business leader. Second, he gets to cash in on free-media as news outlets announce his initiative, using his brand name in virtually every headline.

And Musk wasn’t alone in deploying this strategy during the crisis in Puerto Rico. Mark Cuban-backed LuminAID announced that their emergency light and power backup systems would be included in the relief flight flown by Dallas Mavericks owner’s Boeing 757. The story was featured around the web, and even earned a promotional spot on MSNBC’s Shark Tank, where Mark Cuban serves as an investor/shark.

Use trending stories on social media as real-time inspiration

It can take time for a solid PR strategy to manifest itself into a story worth covering as part of your content marketing efforts. If you’re stuck looking for a story while you wait for your own story to unfold, look no further than Facebook’s trending box.

On a slow news day – which of course always seems to happen on the days that I need a fresh story to post on our blog – I’ve had great success snagging headlines from Facebook trending. And if I publish before the story is old news, I can even take advantage of the trending topic to gain some free attention from Facebook users that are following the story.

Successful content marketers are gurus at finding an angle that makes their message relevant to current events. Whether you’re making the news yourself, or covering an external current event, try to provide context to your how-to content by highlighting juicy stories involving known brands and industry-related events.

 

And if you’d like to know how you can start blogging consistently in 30 minutes a day or less, read our eBook!

how to blog more and blog consistently in 30 min a day or less - ebook by scoop it - download now CTA

The post Learn to leverage clever headlines involving power brands to generate buzzworthy content appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Dan Steiner
Posted: December 18, 2017, 4:30 pm

Everyday, there are 4 million blog posts, 100,000 news articles and 500,000 hours of video published on the Internet. A wealth of information and knowledge. A wealth of information and knowledge that is lost for most companies, at least for the most part. Lost? Step 1: content curation Not entirely. Thanks to content curation technology, the [...]

The post Content intelligence: a new step in the Scoop.it journey appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Everyday, there are 4 million blog posts, 100,000 news articles and 500,000 hours of video published on the Internet. A wealth of information and knowledge. A wealth of information and knowledge that is lost for most companies, at least for the most part.

Lost?

Step 1: content curation

Not entirely. Thanks to content curation technology, the Web can now be filtered. With content curation tools and platforms such as Scoop.it (among others of course), we can use more or less sophisticated ways to filter this huge amount of content that is published daily to zoom in on what matters to us. Good content curation technology is essential. It saves people a huge amount of time looking for content to share for marketing purposes or information that helps their organization make better decisions. And perhaps as importantly, without these filters, we would just be able to search – not discover. We would still find answers to what we don’t know but we wouldn’t know what we don’t know.

But until recently, all the solutions we’ve offered to deal with information overload – ours included – have revolved around the same basic idea: more – or more sophisticated – filters.

This means that so far, the act of analyzing and understanding content that was filtered by a content curation tool remained to be done entirely by its user.  

And that part – analyzing and understanding content – is critical too.

When we look at what our most successful users do – whether they’re content marketers, market intelligence analysts, independent professionals or educators – they all share something. They don’t just filter information but they spend time analyzing it and understanding what it means. The practice of content curation helped them develop a deep understanding of their topics. They say the best writers are readers. We see that happening on the Scoop.it platform too.

Six years into the Scoop.it journey, I continue to talk to users and clients every day. It keeps me real and it helps me understand much better what they want. And what we’ve heard from hundreds of conversations is that there is a huge need to enable a greater understanding of what content is about and what it means:

  • Content marketers want to understand what topics they should create content about and how to create the best content possible on these topics,
  • They want to understand who has success on these topics – who’s influential – so they can find inspiration or potential co-marketing partners,
  • Marketers in general want to understand whether their marketing actions have impact – in an absolute sense but also relatively to their competitors,
  • Market analysts want to understand trending topics and how the conversations evolve on these topics so they can more easily understand what it means for their strategy.

In summary, we heard that beyond content curation, they needed insights and actionable data to make sense of web content.

What they needed was content intelligence.

Step 2: collecting data

So back in 2016, we decided to focus our R&D efforts on providing a solution to this problem. We felt we had a unique asset to do this: data.

Over time and as the platform became adopted by now more than 4 million users, we’ve collected a lot of data. In particular, we get a way to know when a new source is producing interesting content. Every time a Scoop.it user scoops an article using our browser extension on a new website, we have a chance to qualify this website and include it in the list of content sources we can monitor over time.

Having such a large volume of data is one of the key enablers or artificial intelligence algorithms. A lot of what AI does today is to recognize patterns. But to do so it needs to learn from a lot of examples. Very often, companies who’ve developed successful AI systems have done so because they have access to a lot of data.

By monitoring millions of web sources to filter them for content curation, we had a gold mine for an AI platform.

So we started to look at several ways to derive interesting insights from the data we had. Some failed, some were inconclusive and finally, we found a way to produce relevant and consistent results around topic identification at scale.

Our platform learned how to determine what a piece of content was about and how similar it was to another piece.

Step 3: content intelligence

Grouping a large volume of content into coherent topics was a major breakthrough. This enables us to do things such as:

  • Finding what a website is about. For instance, your website or your competitors’ website.
  • Finding out topics related to a certain keyword. For instance, we can find out what topics are covered by the 2,500+ articles published last month with a title that contains “content marketing”.

But we didn’t stop there.

We also enriched our data on content and its attributes with other metrics: performance metrics (such as shares on social networks) or quality metrics (such as word count or readability). And by adding these metrics into the engine, we can get even more interesting insights:

  • Volume of content and popularity on various topics.
  • Benchmarks between different websites across topics.
  • Evolution of these metrics over time.
  • etc…

From filtering the web to analyzing and understanding web content

So that’s where we are: last summer, we started testing internally a first prototype of the new technology we had developed. We showed results over the fall to some of our clients and we’re now running pilots to validate the value of our insights.

We decided to make this a new standalone product for now so we could iterate fast and validate the value proposition independently of the other benefits of the Scoop.it platform, in particular its content curation and publishing capabilities.

And we called it Hawkeye by Scoop.it.

 

 

Our goal with Hawkeye is to provide data and actionable insights that make content marketing more predictable. Nobody creates content in a vacuum: our content will always struggle for attention with many other pieces. The problem is that it’s really hard to look at what each competing website or influencer does on a number of topics – let alone measure it. There’s just too much to do. By leveraging artificial intelligence, Hawkeye monitors, analyzes and understands content from all over the web to help marketers create better content and measure its impact.

Here are some of the reports Hawkeye can already give:

Analyze a topic:

A list of topics related to a certain filter (eg: a keyword) together with volume count (how much content was published on that topic) and popularity (how many times they were shared). Here’s for instance a list of topics, Hawkeye found out all the posts mentioning “content marketing” in their titles, written in English and published over the last 30 days were about:

This can help with identifying topics more likely to be interesting for me as a content marketer (the low volume, high popularity ones since it means people are interested in them but they haven’t been too much covered yet). Or as a market analyst, I could use this to understand new trends I could decide to focus on.

Hawkeye brings data visualization so you can get a sense of the above data in a more visual way such as this graph:

Analyze competitors content across topics

Instead of looking for all content related to say “content marketing”, one of the filters you can feed Hawkeye with is simply a list of websites. In particular a list of competitors or industry references. Hawkeye can come back with high-level KPI’s such as volume of content vs shares:

This can tell you whether you need to produce more content or better content (or both) to catch up with your competitors.

But Hawkeye can use topic analysis to go into greater details and analyze your content gap, ie what topics your competitors are focusing on vs what topics you’re focusing on:

This is going to help you understand where to focus your efforts on, particularly what topics you should create content on.

You can also analyze the specific pieces of content on each of these topics and for instance get the most shared content on that topic as well as the quality score of each of these pieces of content:

Measure share of voice and impact of earned media across topics

Content that helps your brand is not just the one you produce: it’s also what people say about your brand. Hawkeye can not only monitor your brand mentions in web content but also do that across topics and measure the impact of these mentions.

Hawkeye is still a very early product. We’ve had amazing feedback so far but it’s just the beginning. We’re working hard to develop it in many different ways. By enriching the type of data we’re using in our various reports. By creating new reports and data visualizations. By working on making our AI capable of understanding more and more things about content. Ultimately, we’d want Hawkeye to understand content like a human being would.

Because we want to be able to validate the value Hawkeye delivers and iterate fast based on feedback, we’re not yet ready to make Hawkeye publically available. For at least another few months, Hawkeye will be in private beta – which will enable us to run controlled pilots with selected clients who can have significant return from content intelligence. If this describes you, we’d love to hear about it here and have a discussion.

We’ve had an amazing adventure with Scoop.it so far. From an idea we discovered in Silicon Valley to relocating to San Francisco to a platform with 4 million users and hundreds of B2B clients, it’s been quite a ride. But our mission is far from over. The new challenges and technology around content intelligence show us the next stage in our journey might be even more exciting.

The post Content intelligence: a new step in the Scoop.it journey appeared first on Scoop.it Blog.

Author: Guillaume Decugis
Posted: December 14, 2017, 8:19 pm